Green resolutions to help with the environment, our health and pockets

Amongst the most commonly broken new year's resolutions, losing weight, getting fit, eating healthier, and saving money are at the top of the list. But don't feel bad if you find yourself breaking resolutions, whatever they may be. You're in good company.

Most resolutions are broken before the end of January, some experts say. The best way to keep to resolutions is to take small incremental steps towards your goal. With that in mind, here are 3 habit-changing green resolutions that will make you healthier, help the environment, and might even help you save money.

Eat healthy to boost your immunity: Eating healthier can be achieved by what someone recently told us is "mindful eating," which is simply being conscious of what you're eating. You can for example watch out for foods that are linked to obesity and related diseases and consume healthier alternatives. We encourage people to eat as much locally grown food when possible. Buy from your local farmer or start your own mini-garden and grow your own herbs, vegetables, and fruit trees. The rewards are great; we can testify to this from our experience at the Heritage Garden. Growing your own food is also good for the body, mind, and soul as it is proven to be therapeutic. And gardening that takes nature into consideration, for example by using compost, is good for the environment. Local production also reduces our considerable food importation bill as well as our carbon footprint.

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Frugality: We have all been taught about being thrifty - using money and other resources carefully and not wastefully - at some point in our lives. We used to buy less and reuse more, but over the last decades' mass consumerism caught up with us and we've forgotten these vital lessons. If there's anything that the Covid-19 pandemic has taught us, keeping something for tomorrow must surely be at the top of the list. One way of doing this is paring down on wasteful spending, as well as being mindful of how we use our other resources. For instance, you can consider whether you need new clothing or electronics and if so, buying only what you need and buying long-lasting items that don't end up in the landfill after a short time.

Save money fro a rainy day Photo Micheile Henderson Unsplash

(Photo Micheile Henderson - Unsplash)

Keeping healthy physical and mentally: Our recommendation to keep to this resolution is green exercise. It's simple, go outside and walk or run at the beach for at least ten minutes, keeping in mind the restrictions put in place to keep us all safe. Work this into your morning or evening routine. Breathe in the fresh air and appreciate the natural beauty around us. Bring along a litter bag if you feel so inclined, and pick up trash along the way. Your body - and the environment - will thank you.

Go outside and walk in nature while observing safety restrictions

Keep safe everyone.

Amongst the most commonly broken new year's resolutions, losing weight, getting fit, eating healthier, and saving money are at the top of the list. But don't feel bad if you find yourself breaking resolutions, whatever they may be. You're in good company.  Most resolutions are broken before the end of January, some experts say. The best way to keep to resolutions is to take small incremental steps towards your goal. With that in mind, here are 3 habit changing green resolutions that will make you healthier, help the environment and might even help you save money. Eat healthy to boost your immunity: Eating healthier can be achieved by what someone recently told us is "mindful eating," which is simply being conscious of what you're eating. You can for example watch out for foods that are linked to obesity and related diseases and consume healthier alternatives. We encourage people to eat as much locally grown food when possible. Buy from your local farmer or start your own mini-garden and grow your own herbs, vegetables and fruit trees. The rewards are great; we can testify to this from our experience at the Heritage Garden. Growing your own food is also good for the body, mind and soul as it is proven to be therapeutic. And gardening that takes nature into consideration, for example by using compost, is good for the environment. Local production also reduces our considerable food importation bill as well as carbon footprint. Frugality: We have all been taught about being thrifty - using money and other resources carefully and not wastefully - at some point in our lives. We used to buy less and reuse more, but over the last decades mass consumerism caught up with us and we've forgotten these vital lessons. If there's anything that the Covid-19 pandemic has taught us, keeping something for tomorrow must surely be at the top of the list. One way of doing this is paring down on wasteful spending, as well as being mindful of how we use our other resources. For instance, you can consider whether you need new clothing or electronics and if so, buying only what you need and buying long lasting items that don't end up in the landfill after a short time.  Keeping healthy physical and mentally: Our recommendation to keep to this resolution is green exercise. It's simple, go outside and walk or run at the beach for at least ten minutes, keeping in mind the restrictions put in place to keep us all safe. Work this into your morning or evening routine. Breathe in the fresh air and appreciate the natural beauty around us. Bring along a litter bag if you feel so inclined, and pick up trash along the way. Your body - and the environment - will thank you. Keep safe everyone. 

 

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Since 1998.

Seychelles Nature, Green HealthClimate Change, Biodiversity Conservation & Sustainability Organisation

@CousinIsland Manager

Facebook: http://goo.gl/Q9lXM

Roche Caiman, Mahe

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Centre for Environment & Education

Roche Caiman,

P.O. Box 1310, Mahe, Seychelles

Tel:+ 248 4601100

Fax: + 248 4601102

Email: nature@seychelles.net